1909 London young suff

I have a small confession: I also write fiction and have completed two novels, one of which is available on Amazon.

Years ago, someone who read my stuff asked me why all my protagonists were women.

The question caught me off guard, and I probably gave some sort of incoherent answer. The truth was that I was using my fiction writing as a way to inhabit women’s lives in fictional worlds in a way that, at the time, I was unable to inhabit a woman’s life in the real world.

It was a safety valve that bought me some time in my long struggle not to be transgender In the end, it wasn’t enough, not nearly enough.

Sublimation never is.

I just saw a piece about the first English translation of The Odyssey ever done by a woman. All translation is a creative act, as Jorge Luis Borges, the Argentinian poet and short-story author who was himself an important translator of fiction, pointed out. With different languages, since literal translation is rarely possible, the translator must make decisions about how to express what is being said. Inevitably, who the translator is will affect the final product.

Many of the older translations done by males had a decidedly sexist tone.

I want to read Emily Wilson’s version!

https://www.damemagazine.com/2017/12/13/why-the-odysseys-new-translation-matters-to-women/

 

 

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